Month: January 2015

Free College? No Such Thing

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President Obama and the Democratic Party are counting on the, “Stupidity of the American voter,” as the head architect of Obama-care recently put it. The President has just announced his plan to create a federally/state-funded program in which he said, “Two years of college will become as free and universal as high school is today”. He’s promising two free years of community college for anyone who can maintain a C+ average, and follow a couple other simple guidelines. Honestly, though, I can’t imagine his plan is to pull a bunch of 40 year olds back into school, which means this plan is nothing more than Obama’s latest attempt to buy votes from the American youth for the Democratic Party.

Many Obama supporters have been pretty turned off over the last few years by Obama’s performance and his apparent gravity toward scandalous policy failures. This is evidenced by the nearly absolute lack of young-voter-turnout during the last election when Republicans maintained their majority in the House and won the majority in the Senate by a landslide.

In November, Obama’s head architect on Obama-care stated (in regards to the Obama administration having lied in order to get Obama-care passed), “if you had a law which said … healthy people pay in and sick people get money, it would not have passed. Lack of transparency is a huge political advantage. And basically, call it the stupidity of the American voter or whatever, but basically that was really really critical to get for the thing to pass.” Regardless of this horrible truth, according to Gallup, the day after Obama announced free-college for everybody his approval rating spiked to his highest level since August of 2013. Can you say “Purchasing votes for the Democratic Party”?

If Obama were going to personally foot the bill for everyone in America to go to college for two years I’d be on board. Or, if he were starting a charity into which folks could voluntarily dump their money as a means to his stated ends I’d be completely indifferent; people can do what they want with their own money.

Unfortunately, though, Obama is not saying either of these things. What he’s saying is that you and I, and our parents, and our children will be FORCED to pay for everyone to go to college.

We are already paying for the baby-boomers’ retirement, walls across borders, really big telescopes, one-way vehicles to comets and other planets, other people’s doctor visits, other people’s children’s schooling, and thousands of other things that we ought not to be paying for. And, now Obama is proposing legislation dictating that Americans MUST pay for young adults to be put through “higher” education.

This initiative raises some really serious concerns. After all, President Obama isn’t actually talking about “free” college. There couldn’t be an exchange of money for that to be true. He means it will be free to the consumer. In reality, Obama is advocating a hijacking of middle class Americans’ freedom as they will be FORCED to pay $60 Billion dollars for the program over the next decade, according to Politico.com.

And wouldn’t corralling youths into welfare-schools inflate demand and cause a reduction in the supply? And wouldn’t that result in skyrocketing costs? This means that tax-robbed people will end up paying even MORE money for OTHER PEOPLE to obtain a LESSER education!

That’s bad enough without mentioning the opportunity-cost people will suffer who won’t actually benefit from this “furthered” education while they could have been gaining workplace experience and increasing their wages through time in their industry. According to Forbes, “one-third to one-half of recent college graduates [are] taking jobs that usually go to high school graduates –they are “underemployed,” many of them still living with their parents and dependent on parental financial support.”

Forbes later goes on to say, “…[of] every ten students that enter community college, only three graduate within three years.” So why would we want to push even more people into institutions that are already producing such grossly incompetent results? And, won’t this tremendous influx in college-goers completely devalue the college degree for all the people who would otherwise actually benefit from obtaining one?

Also, Bloomberg estimates that every American is already (mostly unwittingly) saddled with $58,000+ in debt to the government’s creditors. Thus, I’d say that stacking this unfunded liability on the shoulders of the working class is a pretty terrible idea.

Further, people can’t afford to pay for other people’s educations (in the same way that they can’t afford to pay for other people’s healthcare). Bloomberg also points out that the average American household currently holds over $15,000 in credit card debt alone. People already come out of government schools financially illiterate, lacking critical thinking skills, and worshiping government. Most people can’t even begin to fathom that voluntary solutions to societal issues might exist without including the State’s force. A government takeover of community college-funding is the first few inches on the slippery slope to government stipulations, regulations, and government-approved curriculum.

The last thing Americans need is for young adults to be manipulated into staying in government-institutions becoming further indoctrinated, and causing true adulthood to be pushed off until years later than it already is.

I think it would have been far more impressive if Obama had decided to improve the government-controlled education system which currently exists; the one that lands American children 26th in Reading, 28th in Science, and 37th in Math compared to the rest of the world, according to Bloomberg. Government really ought to focus on doing less, and performing really, really well at what it already insists on doing.

Liabilities keep getting stacked one atop the next by the bureaucrats who all-too-willingly control our lives and enslave our children, and our children’s children, through national debt. These investments are not liabilities of the government; they’re our liabilities! We, the people, are the ones who’ll have to pay for these programs when America’s creditors come knocking.

It’s no surprise that so many are unable to see the light when it comes to government intrusion. After all, the government forced us to spend 15,000 hours “learning” what the government wanted us to know in government institutions. Our thinking skills are at the level the government wants them to be at.

Writes Nick Anderson of The Washington Post:
“The National Student Clearinghouse, a nonprofit organization, reported in December that there were about 6.1 million students enrolled in public two-year colleges, a drop of 3.5 percent compared to 2013. There had been similar drops in each of the previous two years. Obama officials hope their plan will turn that trend around.” This brings me to my last point.

The federal government has taken over the entire institution of student loans, to the tune of over $1 Trillion of student loan debt, which means that people are paying the Federal government interest on $1 Trillion. That’s quite a bit of income for the Feds. After seeing a decrease for three consecutive years in the number of people seeking “higher” education, the Federal government is planning to force its subjects to foot the bill for the first two years of everyone’s education in order to incentivize student loan applications in years to come. This program is an investment in the future alright – the future of the Federal government’s financial standing.

People are finally realizing that the “higher” in “higher education” doesn’t mean higher than otherwise attainable; it means higher institutional education than what people received at their poorly performing, government-run high schools. People are finally wising up and seeking out jobs in which to gain experience and knowledge. People are seeking the wisdom that living life (with the internet) gets them rather than traveling the traditional educational paths. That means people are losing interest in paying the Federal government for loans. And, since the internet has caused a tremendous decrease in the government’s leverage when using propaganda against its citizens, Obama MUST resort to legislatively criminalizing anyone who doesn’t pay for other people’s college.

This new proposal is simply the latest in a string of wealth-redistribution attempts. Government tells people they’ll get free stuff, and “the stupidity of the American voter” takes over. In reality, people who work hard to earn money for themselves, their families, and their retirement will see their wages garnished and given away to other people. This is textbook wealth-redistribution.

The Feds aren’t really interested in the wellbeing and livelihood of their constituents. They’re interested in getting their hands on our money, and our votes on their side of the ballot, so they can maintain power.

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To, or Not To, Debate: A Lesson

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Below is a recent exchange I had with an unnamed person about a statement they had made on social media regarding the President’s latest endeavor – “free college”. The debate was flawed from the start. So many poorly developed skills and highly developed fallacies were apparent that I felt compelled to save the conversation as a lesson to review.
I was able to openly, respectfully debate some people in the thread, and I even had quite a bit of support in my favor. Still, I’ve redacted all but the comments back and forth between “Instigator” and myself. And while that naming convention certainly denotes bias, you’ll see fairly quickly that it fits like a fogged over, cracked glass slipper.

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Instigator-
On a call today, I heard someone I respect call our President “weak,” “ineffectual,” and a “closeted Muslim.” This was in response to what is currently going down in Paris. So, entirely unrelated things. Thankfully, mine is not a shy or retiring personality, so I told him I disagreed. This is one of the many things our President has done/said recently that make me proud to be an American. I hope it’s not just a pipe dream. (And by that I mean: I hope the Republican-saturated Congress doesn’t scuttle the thing, either out of “fiscal conservatism” or out of spite.)
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Pcoast-
I tried not to say anything, but it seems almost irresponsible of me not to. Here’s a different perspective:
What if they scuttle it out of common sense? After all, it isn’t actually “free” college. It is, in fact, a hijacking of middle class Americans’ freedom since they will be FORCED to pay billions of dollars annually for the program. And wouldn’t corralling youths into welfare-schools inflate demand and cause a reduction in the supply? And wouldn’t that result in skyrocketing costs? This means that tax-robbed people will end up paying even more money for a lesser education that they, themselves, aren’t even getting! Not to mention, the opportunity cost people will pay who won’t actually benefit from this “furthered” education while they could have been gaining workplace experience and increasing their wages through time in their industry. And, won’t this tremendous influx in college-goers completely devalue the college degree for all the people who actually would otherwise benefit from obtaining one? Also, being that every American is already $58,000 in debt to the government’s creditors, I’d say that stacking this unfunded liability on the shoulders of the working class is a pretty terrible idea. Further, people can’t afford to pay for other people’s educations (in the same way that they can’t afford to pay for other people’s healthcare); the average American household is over $15,000 in credit card debt alone. People already come out of government schools worshiping government, financially illiterate and with an inability to think critically. A government takeover of community college-funding is the first few inches on the slippery slope to government stipulations, regulations, and government-approved curriculum. And the last thing Americans need is for young adults to be manipulated into staying in government-institutions becoming further indoctrinated, and causing true adulthood to be pushed off until years later than it already is. I think it would have been far more impressive if Obama had decided to improve the government-controlled education system which currently exists; the one that lands American children 26th in Reading, 28th in Science, and 37th in Math compared to the rest of the world. Government really ought to focus on doing less, and performing really well at what it already insists on doing.
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Instigator-
Pcoast, we’re not going to do this here. Sorry you couldn’t help but say something. Your blanket bias against our government is just as ignorant as any kind of blanket bias in its favor. Anything else I say in response to you at this point will make me sound arrogant. After all, my vantage point on this issue comes from a level of education you neither admire nor aspire to. So, you can vote vehemently against this prospective program at this nascent stage on principle if you want to. I will reserve my final opinion for when a true plan shakes itself out (and answers many of the valid questions asked on this thread), and will cast my vote at that time.
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Pcoast-
It sounds as though I’ve offended you, and I certainly didn’t mean to. I tried to stick to the issue, and I think I did a pretty good job. I didn’t attack you whatsoever. Your level of education is astounding! I love that you’ve spent years studying your passions. I hadn’t thought to praise you for it while discussing President Obama’s initiative, though. And I didn’t realize that your education and experience in writing made you an unquestionable expert on all things political. You are right, though; I do not aspire to your level of college-education. I am a fairly well educated person in my own right though – I swear! As for my “bias” against government, you’re only partially correct. I have what you call a “bias” toward the INITIATION of force. And, yes, that includes government. Lastly, as you well know, I don’t vote (see my article https://pcoastcompelled.wordpress.com/…/i-dont-vote…/ ) I don’t think you have to worry about coming across as arrogant, as you’ve already set sail. LOL
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Instigator-
Acquaintance, I’d say that my brother is trolling you, but he actually believes this stuff. And true believers will not be dissuaded from their limited world views regardless of how reasonable or right you are. Save your energy and your time, my friend. And don’t worry, because he doesn’t vote! 🙂 And Pcoast, don’t worry about insulting me. We may be on opposite sides of this issue (of most issues!), but I respect your willingness to articulate your viewpoint. Allow me to boil it down a bit: I think taxes are necessary and civilized and ought to be used to benefit the people who pay them; you don’t accept my premise, and therefore, we’re not actually arguing.
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Pcoast-
Trolling? How passive aggressive of you.
“Actually believes this stuff”? So you’re saying that I’m unique in my thoughts? That this isn’t real?
“True believers”? As if it’s organized? Like a cult or something?
“Limited worldview”? As though we don’t live in the age of information, and I haven’t traveled enough to hold credibility?
“He doesn’t vote” As if I don’t try to affect positive change in my own way?
“Don’t worry about insulting me”? As if I did? I never did insult you. I made no personal attacks.
“I respect your willingness to articulate your viewpoint”? So you don’t respect the honesty, integrity, well-articulated arguments to the point? You just respect my “willingness”? As though I’m amusing you with my haphazardly placed words?
“You don’t agree with my premise…we’re not arguing”?
You seem to be unable to keep from filling your paragraphs with atrocious amounts of ad hominem, and dozens of other obvious fallacies, assumptions and allusions. You’re correct when you say “we’re not arguing”. I am making arguments. You are making noise
It’s unfortunate. Someone with your academic clout should have the ability to discern arguments from name calling and distraction within their own written word; then again, now I’m making an assumption.
BTW, this is all in good humor. I know you “actually believe” your viewpoint too.
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Instigator-
Pcoast, let it go, man. I’ve tried to keep it light, but your own passive aggression is drowning any possible good point you’re attempting to make. Acquaintance2 did make some good points, and I’d love to engage her… but she’s being measured and respectful. You’re being a pain in the ass. Read the room. And then re-read your comments, because they’re full of intended insults and sarcasm and every other unworthwhile waste of hot air. We, you and I, are not arguing. You’re slinging crap and I’m hoping you’ll relax and allow others a chance to share their opinions. Or not. Because this is Facebook, and minds aren’t changed here.
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Pcoast-
Instigator, I really don’t understand where you felt attacked. I reread my comments, and I felt they were clear and well-stated. I saw no personal attacks (outside of agreeing with you that you sounded arrogant). I’ve noticed over the years that you tend to only allow people to question you if they aren’t related to you, and even then, only if they don’t disagree. Calling my views, “Crap,” and suggesting that my articulation is carelessly slung about are very obvious misconceptions (at best). Implying that my comments aren’t measured or respectful is also a mischaracterization. I suggest you reread YOUR and my comments and see exactly where you misstepped. And, please don’t let me stand in the way of your response to Acquaintance2. Indeed, she made excellent points.
And, in case I didn’t make it clear, your credentials are worth nothing to the vast majority of people. You began attacking me when you touted your credentials saying that “After all, my vantage point on this issue comes from a level of education you neither admire nor aspire to,” implying that those without your particular educational path are mere simpletons. Actually, when it comes to people in general, if dey ain’t employing’ ya, dey don wanna hur boutchya digreeez, ya heard!? LOL.
You mischaracterized my comments from the get-go. So, YOU, please, “relax” and allow other opinions to be stated. And, YOU, stop “being a pain in the ass” and “slinging crap”.
And, btw, I’m still smiling on my end.
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Brother-
Moral to the story…. Don’t post things and not expect people to express their differing opinions. With that said this was extremely entertaining.
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Instigator-
So glad to see that, as I slept, Pcoast, Acquaintance, and Acquaintance2 had such a fruitful conversation. Brother, I’d say the moral of this story is that no matter what I post, if Pcoast has his panties in a bunch about some tangential issue, he’s going to hijack the thread and be himself. And I shouldn’t waste my time trying to stop him. I welcome debate when I assert my opinion… But here, I wasn’t arguing anything.

Instigator-
Well, reading back, I can see how my attempts not to engage my brother(s) on this thread could sound dismissive and arrogant. That wasn’t my intent. If I post something on Facebook, whether I like it or not, that’s construed as a public endorsement of something. Probably more/different than I what I actually intended to support. I do expect and appreciate debate, and once something is public, it’s not up to me to decide who gets to comment or how many times or where he will take his argument. While I maintain my right not to engage, it is wrong to state that while also jabbing and insulting others in the process. Pcoast, I apologize for being passive aggressive and openly dismissive of your point of view.
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Pcoast-
Instigator,
You don’t seriously expect me to accept that backhanded grenade of a faux-apology, do you?
“Whether you like it or not” is irrelevant; your initial post reads, “This is one of the many things our President has done/said recently that make me proud to be an American. I hope it’s not just a pipe dream.” While I guess you COULD have meant that you’re proud he can speak at all…and that you hope it’s a pipe-nightmare… those possibilities were dashed when you went on to say, “I hope the Republican-saturated Congress doesn’t scuttle the thing, either out of “fiscal conservatism” or out of spite.”
To say that I am “considering” your post an endorsement, because you said it publicly on FB is, yet again, a mischaracterization of reality on your part. YOU ENDORSED IT, loud and clear (see quotes above).
Also, when you say, “…once something is public, it’s not up to me to decide who gets to comment or how many times or where he will take his argument,” you are implying that I went somewhere inappropriate with the debate, spoke too much, pushed an unheard of agenda, and even that this was “his” argument. In fact, my views are, more or less, shared by many, and YOU made a controversial post – not me; this is your argument as much as it is mine. You’re attempting to paint yourself in a victim’s light here as though I’ve bullied you. In truth, I’ve done no such thing, you are not a victim of anything, and I find your effort at painting ME as a bully, well, bully-like. And, I respond to criticisms of myself and my views regularly and respectfully in debates; it doesn’t bother me that people (in this case you) are unable to create a valid argument resorting to name-calling and false implications – that means you’ve given up. I do point it out, though, because I don’t like making people read between the lines.
Lastly, your most recent comment, apologetic as it may seem, begins, “I can see how my attempts not to engage my brother(s) on this thread could sound dismissive and arrogant. That wasn’t my intent.” If you think me a fool once, shame on me for my presentation; however, the second time… BOOOOO to you!!
You didn’t MEAN to come across as dismissive and arrogant? Really? In your first response to my views you accused me of having “blanket bias”, you called me “ignorant”, you admitted that you were already bordering arrogance, you held your college-education over my head as an attack on my credibility (as if your studies in writing have something MORE to do with an understanding of political sciences, economics, philosophy, etc. than my own education), you accused me of having no appreciation for your credentials (which, to be fair, I appreciated more before this stream’s genesis), and you pulled back your initial endorsement stating that, “I will reserve my final opinion for…” in an obvious back-pedaling stab at sounding more neutral to the matter than you did in your initial post.
You mischaracterized my views, abused your formal educational authority, and implied absolute falsehoods, both about me (personally) and about the information and views I was putting forth, throughout the entire exchange. You even ended with a revolting attack on my morality, organization, comprehension, etc., and you had the nerve to disguise that attack as an apology. I’m not easily hurt, so no damage was done to my feelings. No apology is necessary.
I’d rather you truly read back over this conversation and learn about yourself, and become a better version of you. Your passion and your writing abilities could be a tremendous force if honed properly, whether for good or bad is, I suppose, up for debate?
This will be my last post in this thread. I enjoy a good debate. This thread did provide some good ideas. It’s wonderful to know that folks are staying atop the issues at hand, and thinking.

Pcoast-
P.S. This has been an excellent opportunity for people involved to see how many different ways a person can juke, dodge, distract, and tap-dance around issues when they’re losing a debate. My initial comment was concise and raised entirely valid points without any hint of attack. However, Instigator ‘s initial post was firm in her approval of Obama’s proposal, so she felt attacked by my points. This is understandable. But, rather than research, or otherwise find answers to the points I raised, she switched immediately to personal attack. And, she kept on swinging throughout the conversation. This thread is truly a magnificent read when going through it in its entirety for the purpose of learning the what-to-do’s and what-NOT-to-do’s when discussing important, controversial topics. This conversation has been at least vaguely funny, also, because the topic of “further subsidized tuition” isn’t a particularly inflammatory one.

New Year / Same Loathing: A quick fix!

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Every year I tell myself I’m going to do something really productive that’ll add substance to my life or bring me some sort of comfort. Last year I resolved to quit smoking. The year before I promised myself I’d lose twenty pounds. Actually, I had decided to do both of these things every year for the last five years, but January just keeps on rearing its head and taunting me to remake these promises and others.

New Year Resolutions, in my experience, tend to be mildly ridiculous in nature. They seem to always require some skill I don’t have, some will-power I’m unwilling to derive, a tool I’ll certainly not acquire, or means which will foreseeably remain out of my reach. Why do I do this to myself? It’s such a silly ritual – on the verge of superstition even. But so many people make them.

“Well I have to buy a new calendar on Wednesday, guess I better start workin’ out, or run a marathon or something.”

“I suppose I’ll eat more vegetables, and watch less TV.”

“I reckon I’ll be more attentive in my relationships this Wednesday.”

“Yep, On Wednesday I’ll start saving, stop eating fast food, learn to love myself, become bi-lingual, take a trip, meditate, take in some live-theater, become less self-conscious, pay off my credit cards, quit biting my toenails and begin an organization to piggy-back cripples all over town!”

People are nuts! Honestly, the concept of bettering oneself for the sake of being better is a pretty decent idea. And, good on the guy or gal who thought it up. But, what the hell, man? At what point do we draw the line between betterment and self-hate.

Do we really possess so few amiable qualities that we are in need of consciously acquiring new ones? Are we so unimpressive that we must accomplish enormous feats to prove our worth? And, who are we attempting to justify our existence to? Ourselves, our spouses, our families, our acquaintances, our Gods?

Surviving the first year of human life is remarkable. Keeping up with our peers in the monotonous confines of public school for 13 years is astounding. Think of all the challenging social horrors everyone overcame in those years: trying to listen to the right music, trying not to sound stupid, trying to sound cool, trying to wear the right clothes – the right way, trying to look athletic, trying to cover up pimples, trying to talk to the opposite sex, trying to learn enough to pass 35+ classes, juggling friends, emotionally charged relationships, parents’ demands, first jobs, learning to handle money, etc. It might be that the only reason anyone survives modern adolescence at all is due to distraction from the option not to.

And after most of that nonsense finally subsides as we reach our early twenties life begins to move so rapidly that most of the memories spiral past us and stretch over years and become nothing more than vague outlines in the margins of our minds. Yet we press on.

So don’t be so hard on yourself this year. You’re doing just fine. Regardless of where you are in life, you’re probably, at least, okay. And rather than become resolute in achieving some whacky pipe-dream I have a suggestion: try to write down five or ten things that you already do fairly well, or are decent at, and resolve to accentuate those qualities, instead.

So if you find yourself good-looking, be even better looking! No…not really. But, for example, if you feel you’re fairly generous, empathetic, an honest employee, a social-bug, and you eat two baby-carrots on the first Tuesday of every other month…. Try to find ways to emphasize your generosity. This doesn’t always entail money; many organizations will gladly accept your time, and you can use the experience to broaden your social network. You might read about a culture or subculture in society that you’d otherwise written off in an effort to learn about them and heighten your ability to empathize. Try to go out of your way to save money at work, or think of a way to improve something in the workplace that would otherwise be overlooked. And eat your damn vegetables, people! They’re. Good. For. You.

In other words, focus on your better qualities and put them to use more often. Recognizing your positive attributes builds confidence, and being this vague with your resolutions will allow for more opportunities to accomplish them. If you exploit those opportunities, I think you’ll find it a more rewarding and positive experience overall. Of course, if you can’t think of five things… there’s always a marathon.